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How to make Furikake Seasoning- a Japanese spice blend made with dried seaweed (nori), toasted sesame seeds, salt, spices  and optional bonito flakes. Use on rice, veggies, fish or avocado toast! Vegan & Gluten-free. Video!

How to make Furikake- a Japanese spice blend made with seaweed, sesame seeds, salt and optional bonito and spices. Use on rice, veggies, fish or avocado toast! Vegan and Gluten-free. #furikake

If you’ve been here a while, you have probably noticed Furikake being featured in some of the recipes over the years. It’s a Japanese seasoning blend that really enhances the foods we are already making. It is delicious over Japanese Rice, Poke bowls, or Poke Beets, or Vegan Ramen!  Lately, I’ve been sprinkling it over avocado toast and cucumber salads for the best flavor!

Recently a reader asked me how to make it because where she lived, it was nowhere to be found. These days it is pretty accessible in urban areas, easily found at most upscale grocery stores, Asian Markets, and even at Trader Joes. I really love this brand of Furikake!

But if you, like her would like to make it yourself, it is very easy and doable!

How to make Furikake | 60-sec video

PLUS Homemade Furikake would also make a beautiful hostess gift!

What is Furikake?

Furikake is a Japanese seasoning typically made with toasted sesame seeds, nori, salt, sugar. It varies from region to region can also include anything from bonito flakes, to chili flakes to miso powder to shitake powder to poppy seeds. Some versions even include dried shiso leaves (another thing to do with your shiso leaves next summer).

How to make Furikake- a Japanese spice blend made with seaweed, toasted sesame seeds, salt and optional bonito and spices. Use on rice, veggies, fish or avocado toast! Vegan and Gluten-free. #furikake

How do you Make Furikake?

  1. Lightly grind sesame seeds to release their oil.
  2. Toast sesame seeds until fragrant and golden.
  3. Mix with shredded nori.
  4. Season with salt and sugar.
  5. Optional: Add chili flakes, bonito, dried shiso, shiitake powder or miso powder.
  6. Store in an air-tight jar for up to 6 months.

How to make Furikake- a Japanese spice blend made with seaweed, toasted sesame seeds, salt and optional bonito and spices. Use on rice, veggies, fish or avocado toast! Vegan and Gluten-free. #furikake

Lightly grinding the sesame seeds, releases their oil, making them more flavorful when toasted.

How to make Furikake- a Japanese spice blend made with seaweed, toasted sesame seeds, salt and optional bonito and spices. Use on rice, veggies, fish or avocado toast! Vegan and Gluten-free. #furikake

Toast until nutty and fragrant, constantly over very low heat for 8-9 minutes.

How to make Furikake- a Japanese spice blend made with seaweed, toasted sesame seeds, salt and optional bonito and spices. Use on rice, veggies, fish or avocado toast! Vegan and Gluten-free. #furikake

Shred, crumble or cut nori sheets.

To crumble Nori sheets, tear into small pieces, then crumble with your fingers.  Or cut with a knife or scissors.

How to make Furikake- a Japanese spice blend made with seaweed, toasted sesame seeds, salt and optional bonito and spices. Use on rice, veggies, fish or avocado toast! Vegan and Gluten-free. #furikake

Stacking and folding the nori before slicing makes for faster and easier work.

How to make Furikake- a Japanese spice blend made with seaweed, toasted sesame seeds, salt and optional bonito and spices. Use on rice, veggies, fish or avocado toast! Vegan and Gluten-free. #furikake

Then just mix everything together in a small bowl, adding salt and sugar.

Add any additions you like: (all optional)

How to make Furikake- a Japanese spice blend made with seaweed, toasted sesame seeds, salt and optional bonito and spices. Use on rice, veggies, fish or avocado toast! Vegan and Gluten-free. #furikake

Store in a sealed jar for 4-6 months.

How to use Furikake Seasoning?

  • sprinkle over rice
  • sprinkle on sushi
  • sprinkle on avocado toast
  • over eggs
  • on veggies
  • over fish, or smoked salmon
  • over tofu
  • Sprinkle over ramen or sushi bowls
  • sprinkle over Poke salad or poke bowls
  • Over egg salad or tuna salad

How to make Furikake- a Japanese spice blend made with seaweed, toasted sesame seeds, salt and optional bonito and spices. Use on rice, veggies, fish or avocado toast! Vegan and Gluten-free. #furikake

 Recipes that use Furikake Seasoning:

Hope you give this a try and enjoy!

Happy seasoning,

Sylvia

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How to make Furikake- a Japanese spice blend made with seaweed, toasted sesame seeds, salt and optional bonito and spices. Use on rice, veggies, fish or avocado toast! Vegan and Gluten-free. #furikake

Furikake Recipe

  • Author: Tonia Schemmel | Feasting at Home
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 5
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 1/2 cup 1x
  • Category: spice, spice blend
  • Method: toasted
  • Cuisine: Japanese
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

How to make Furikake- a Japanese spice blend made with seaweed, toasted sesame seeds, salt and optional bonito and spices. Use on rice, veggies, fish or avocado toast! Vegan and Gluten-free. #furikake


Ingredients

Units Scale

Basic Furikake Base:

  • 1/2 cup white sesame seeds (see notes)
  • 23 seasoned nori sheets (or plain)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, more to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar (optional, but good)

Optional additions:  (The proportions are just a starting point.)


Instructions

  1. In a food processor or spice grinder, pulse sesame seeds 1 or 2 times so that the seeds are partially ground, leaving some whole, taking care they grind quickly.
  2. Place seeds in a cast iron pan (or sauté pan) on low heat, stirring every minute or so until they become fragrant and lightly toasted, 7-8 minutes.
  3. Stack, fold and cut nori into small strips then cut into small pieces with a sharp knife or kitchen scissors, or you can also crumble with your hands. 
  4. Add to sesame seeds in a small bowl, along with salt and sugar. 
  5. Add any additional ingredients ( see ideas and get creative!)
  6. Store in an air tight container for up to 6 months.

Notes

Grind the seeds just a little – to better incorporate the salt, sugar and optional ingredients more evenly and help release the sesame oil.

The sugar is optional but gives a sweet savory balance.

Nori sheets – use regular, seasoned can add great flavor (wasabi, sesame oil, chili)

If using already toasted sesame seeds, no need to toast again.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 teaspoon
  • Calories: 18
  • Sugar: 0.1 g
  • Sodium: 48.9 mg
  • Fat: 1.5 g
  • Saturated Fat: 0.2 g
  • Carbohydrates: 0.8 g
  • Fiber: 0.4 g
  • Protein: 0.5 g
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg

Keywords: how to make furikake, furikake recipe

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  1. My first attempt didn’t work out and I’m hoping you can help me troubleshoot. I remember having furikake in Japan and the nori flakes were very small, but I found that they do not crumble and even if cut it’s very hard to reduce them to small flakes. I even tried putting mine in the coffee grinder, but it didn’t work. This made me wonder if the Japanese perhaps fry their nori sheets lightly before crumbling them to make furikake?

    The other issue I had was putting the sesame seeds in my coffee grinder reduced them almost to dust after just a few brief spins! So what I ended up with was sesame dust with some much larger jagged nori pieces sticking out of them!

    Hopefully it will still taste good on rice. But I’m going to try and again and this time lightly fry the nori sheets before crumbling, and only spin the sesame once very lightly in my grinder.

    Grinding the sesame definitely brings out a very nice fragrance from the seeds, but they are very delicate!

    1. Hi Ross, Cutting the nori is probably the most time consuming part. I usually use scissors. You can also get the seasoned nori sheets that are sold as snacks, they are crisped in oil and crumble more easily. You could try just grinding some of the sesame so you have some whole and some ground. I bet it will still taste good, but I understand it was not what you were expecting!

  2. Unfortunately I no longer trust Bonito or Asian seaweed products post Fukushima. What are the safer alternative ingredients to replace these with in the West ?

    1. Yes, I usnderstand. I am honestly trying to figure this out myself. I have been trying to hunt down Atlantic seaweed – there is a brand called Main Coast Seaweed and I use their dulse- not sure what else they offer?

    2. Japanese food standards on permitted levels of radioactivity in products were already stricter than most in the West pre-Fukushima, and are even stricter since.

  3. Hey! Would you recommend storing this in a freezer or fridge? Also if I’m making a single serving twice a week or so, how long will this last me? Thank you for the wonderful recipe by the way!

    1. Hi Molly, I like to store this in the fridge, though the freezer is fine too. There are about 8 tablespoons (1/2 cup) per recipe so maybe a month or so depending on how much you like to use!

  4. Ok, going nuts here. I have just made your Furikake and it is so flavorful. I had to use my seaweed snack sheets and I don’t have any sesame seeds, but will get both the nouri sheets and the sesame seeds today. I just want to make everything it all looks so good! The seasoning, red enchilada sauce, and the sourdough starter (in the process of making – hope I don’t ruin it) are just fantastic! I will be putting this seasoning on everything! Finally…I feel like a good home cook in the making.

    1. Amazing Rita! Love it all. I actually prefer the seaweed snack sheets but addicting either way!

  5. My local Grocery Store does not carry this seasoning pre bottled but they sell Nori sheets and Sesame seeds black and white ones witch for me is good I like to make everything myself when I can and this is such a simple recipe but can really give you some great flavor for Rice Sushi or what ever you may decide to use this on Thanks for the Idea’s gonna try a different one tonight when I make my spicy tuna bowl…

    1. They definitely add to the mix though not in place of the white sesame seeds.

      1. I totally agree not only color but they part some flavor too bonito flakes is a good option too for a little added flavor

  6. Thank you so much for posting this! I looked into a brand of the seasoning and it had some types of additives; I just cannot stand to use something with those!

    I just found out about sushi bake and needed furikake for that, but I will def use your ideas for other recipe toppings, as well as adding additional ingredients, like bonito, etc.

    Aloha!

    1. The basic recipe is vegan. We list the bonito flakes under the optional ingredients to give you ideas so you can adapt to make your own desired version. 🙂

  7. So delicious and part of the fun is the flexibility of ingredients and making a blend yourself instead of paying for a tiny jar at the store.

  8. yum! so good and quick to make. love all the adaptation options.
    I added dulse, shiitake powder and red chili flakes…
    so rich and delicious. I keep finding many things to eat it on!
    thanks for all your inspiration. LOVE your recipes.

  9. I don’t think you should be calling this recipe vegan as you added bonito (dried tuna) flakes to the mix. Maybe leaving the bonito as an optional item would allow you to call the recipe “vegan friendly” but as it stands, this isn’t a vegan condiment.

Hi, I'm Sylvia!

Chef and author of the whole-foods recipe blog, Feasting at Home, Sylvia Fountaine is a former restaurant owner and caterer turned full-time food blogger. She currently lives in the Pacific Northwest and shares seasonal, healthy recipes along with tips and tricks from her home kitchen.

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