An authentic Za’atar Spice Recipe, a Middle Eastern spice blend that can be used in a multitude of ways. Use this as a rub for chicken, beef, lamb or fish, sprinkle it over hummus, Labneh or baba ganoush! Or mix with olive oil for a flavorful marinade. With a video! 
A simple recipe for Za'atar, a flavorful Middle Eastern spice blend that can be used in a multitude of ways. | #zaatar #za'atar #spices #|spiceblend www.feastingathome.com
The true miracle lies in our eagerness to allow, appreciate, and honor the uniqueness, and freedom of each sentient being to sing the song of their heart. ― Amit Ray

What is za’atar? 

Here is a simple recipe for Zaatar Spice   – a flavorful Middle Eastern spice blend used in many dishes throughout the Middle East, and like curry, varies from region to region depending on where you are. 

What is Zaatar made of?

 Za’atar Spice is a blend of savory dried herbs like oregano, marjoram or thyme, and toasted earthy spices like cumin and coriander, with sesame seeds, salt and the most important ingredient of all… sumac! Sumac gives it the delicious unexpected tanginess that to me, is the key to the best zaatar.

How to make Zaatar | 60-second video


How to use Zaatar Spice?

My Egyptian father would make his own version of zaatar (this one here!) and would sprinkle it over hummus, labneh,  baba ganoush or over fresh pita bread drizzled with olive oil before going in the oven to toast.  But there are a multitude of uses for Za’atar spice and I’m so excited for you to get acquainted with it and discover your own delicious uses!
You can also purchase Za’atar Spice here at our Bowl and Pitcher Store and most Middle Eastern stores or upscale specialty grocery stores. I really love this Villa Jerada Zaatar Spice Blend! We also have their sumac.
A simple recipe for Za'atar, a flavorful Middle Eastern spice blend that can be used in a multitude of ways. | #zaatar #za'atar #spices #|spiceblend www.feastingathome.com
I hope you enjoy making the Za’atar. Please share how you use it in the comments below.
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Za'atar Spice Recipe, a flavorful Middle Eastern spice blend that can be used in a multitude of ways. | #zaatar #za'atar #spices #|spiceblend www.feastingathome.com

Authentic Za’atar Spice Recipe


Description

An authentic recipe for Za’atar Spice – a flavorful Middle Eastern Spice that can be used to season hummus, baba ganoush, vegetables, meats, etc.  (My Egyptian Dad’s recipe.)


Ingredients

Scale
  1. 1 tablespoon dried thyme- crushed (or sub oregano)
  2. 1 tablespoon  cumin (see instructions about whole or ground)
  3. 1 tablespoon  coriander
  4. 1 tablespoon toasted  sesame seeds
  5. 1 tablespoon sumac
  6. ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  7. ¼ teaspoon or more aleppo chili flakes- optional

Instructions

  • Mix all the ingredients together in a small bowl. Store in an airtight container.
  • For the most flavor, toast whole seeds (cumin seeds and coriander seeds) until fragrant, then grind. This will make the most flavorful zaatar. If you don’t have whole seeds, feel free to use ground spices.

Notes

There are many variations of Zaatar. This was my dad’s recipe- he was Egyptian. Other regions have different versions. There is not one “right” way. It varies from area to area, and even household to household.

This Villa Jerada Zaatar Spice Blend is lovely if you rather purchase it! Made in Seattle!


Nutrition

  • Calories: 15

Keywords: zaatar, za'atar, zaatar recipe , zaatar spices, za'atar recipe, za'atar spices, za'atar spice recipe

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Hi, I'm Sylvia!

Chef and author of the whole-foods recipe blog, Feasting at Home, Sylvia Fountaine is a former restaurant owner and caterer turned full-time food blogger. She currently lives in the Pacific Northwest and shares seasonal, healthy recipes along with tips and tricks from her home kitchen.

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Comments

  1. Hi Sylvia. I’m from Indonesia. Thank you for the recipe.
    The taste suits my tongue.

    Hm.. can you help me what’s sumac subsitusion? ’cause it’s difficult to find sumac here. Thank you so much

    1. Sumac has a very sour taste. I would use lemon zest- let it dry out first, leave it on the counter for 1-2 days, or in a warm oven, until completely dry. Then grind.

  2. This recipe is fantastic. I have to be gluten free and every Za’atar seasoning that I looked at in the store had wheat in it. This is a healthier version and soooo easy to make. Thank you for sharing this recipe.

  3. This is lovely. I def recommend toasting and grinding the whole spices. Makes a world of difference. Thanks.

  4. Hi Sylvia,
    My son has severe food allergies to legume (peas, lentils, peanuts, white beans, lima beans) except pinto beans, black beans and kidney beans. Is there a bean similar to garbanzo beans that will work well for hummus?

    1. Hi Eliza- you can make hummus out of any bean! It might not be light in color, but great texture and flavor. I personally love black bean hummus!

      1. You can make hummus out of any bean?! Oh my gosh, that thought never occurred to me! I’ve got to check out some recipes for black bean hummus. Do you have a favorite?

        Funny, I came here to explore za’atar ideas, and the subject got completely changed!

        1. Yes, Jamie -any bean! We don’t have a recipe for black bean hummus but I love making it with a Mexican twist- lime elevates!

  5. That’s very cool Sylvia, coming from Iran I am seasoned sumac user, but never knew about za’atar, thanks so much. cheers from Vancouver, Canada

  6. actually it should be made with hyssop, that is the original and that is traditional, thyme oregano are cheaper to obtain and taste no where like hyssop actually but it makes it green

  7. Thank you for this recipe. I swapped chilli flakes for turmeric (that’s what was in the cupboard!)
    I makes a lovely addition to soups and stews x x

  8. To be culinanarily honest.. its oregano and thyme/ marjoram. Not just one of the 3. Gotta have two. But you’re close