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How to make Turmeric Sauerkraut- a small-batch recipe with only 15 minutes of hands-on time before mother nature takes over. Full of healthy probiotics, use this in Bowls, wraps, sandwiches or as a tasty side dish! 

How to make Turmeric Sauerkraut- a small-batch recipe that can be put together in 10 minutes, and sits on the counter for 3-5 days. | #kraut #fermented #sauerkraut www.feastingathome.com

A quick, small-batch recipe for Turmeric Sauerkraut that can be mixed up in about 10 minutes before it rests on your counter for 3-5 days. Then just let nature take its course!

It’s perfect for that leftover half-head of cabbage in your fridge. If turmeric is not your thing, simply leave it out. You can season this sauerkraut with anything you want- but the most important thing I hope you take away here is how simple it is to make – anyone can do this! It’s not scary or complicated. Here’s our basic Sauerkraut recipe with the most detail and another version using shredded beets! 

What I love about this recipe is how delicious and healthy it is. I use it in many of the healthy bowls you see here- a tangy accent to brighten up most any dish,  plus it is FULL of healthy probiotics to help heal the gut. It’s also incredibly affordable.  It’s delicious in this Tempeh Reuben Sandwich with Smoked Mozzarella and Turmeric Sauerkraut. So good!

What you will need:

  • Organic cabbage- green works best here! 
  • Onion
  • Garlic 
  • Ginger- freshly grated 
  • Turmeric – freshly grated or use ground turmeric 
  • Salt– use mineral salt or fine sea salt

How to Make Turmeric Sauerkraut

Step One:  To start, shred or slice organic cabbage and onion, either by thinly slicing, using a mandolin or placing in a food processor.

Step 2: Add the garlic and ginger, and weigh the cabbage mixture in grams,  then multiply by .02.  (See recipe notes for an example.)

This number is the amount of salt you will need in grams. 

Step 3: Add the salt – massage the cabbage well- this allows its pores to open up which helps the natural bacteria from the cabbage itself get inside the pores-  for better fermenting.

Simple Turmeric Sour Kraut- a small-batch recipe that can be put together in 10 minutes, and sits on the couture for 3-5 days. | www.feastingathome.com

Step 4: Stir in the fresh turmeric. You can use ground turmeric instead of fresh, or in addition to the fresh, to boost color. Go conservative, add more to taste.

Step 4: Let sit 30 minutes to 2 hours until cabbage releases it’s liquid, stirring occasionally.

Simple Turmeric Sour Kraut- a small-batch recipe that can be put together in 10 minutes, and sits on the couture for 3-5 days. | www.feastingathome.com

Step 5: Pack the turmeric kraut in clean jars, leaving 2-3 inches of headroom.  Top with a cabbage leaf to prevent oxidation.

Simple Turmeric Sour Kraut- a small-batch recipe that can be put together in 10 minutes, and sits on the couture for 3-5 days. | www.feastingathome.com

Step 6:  Weigh it down so the cabbage stays submerged under the brine. This will prevent any mold or oxidation.  Use a fermentation weight, or place a ziplock bag filled with a little water to weigh the Turmeric Sauerkraut down. You could also fill the bag with dried beans or rice, or use a smaller jar.

I have had great success with this Fermentation Kit that has crystal weights that fit perfectly in a wide-mouth mason jar.  It is so convenient for small batch ferments. This fermentation kit includes the jars which is a great option too!

Simple Turmeric Sour Kraut- a small-batch recipe that can be put together in 10 minutes, and sits on the couture for 3-5 days. | www.feastingathome.com

Step 7: Cover loosely with a lid, place in a dark cool spot ( like the basement) or set on the counter ( in a bowl), cover with a towel and let ferment for 4-5 days.

This is a shorter fermentation that will yield fresh crunchy sauerkraut, which I love. After 4-5 days, check for an activity like bubbling.

For a more sour flavor, ferment longer.

Keep in mind the warmer the spot the faster the fermentation- so in summer you may want to place it somewhere cool, like in the basement.

Slower,  cooler ferments (60-72 degrees is ideal)  make the best kraut!

How to make Turmeric Sauerkraut- a small-batch recipe that can be put together in 10 minutes, and sits on the counter for 3-5 days. | #kraut #fermented #sauerkraut www.feastingathome.com

Step 8: After you have confirmed fermentation activity ( bubbling when you stir or tap the jar, with a  tangy taste) feel free to place it in the refrigerator. It is ready to eat now, but we love this best after 1-2 more weeks in the fridge.

 

How to make Turmeric Sauerkraut- a small-batch recipe that can be put together in 10 minutes, and sits on the counter for 3-5 days. | #kraut #fermented #sauerkraut www.feastingathome.com

Ways to use Turmeric Kraut:

Toss it in salads, add to Buddha bowls, layer in sandwiches (like this Reuben)  or add to wraps– you’ll find a million uses!

I like to eat it right out of the jar with a fork, before meals, to allow it to nourish my gut.

Turmeric Sauerkraut- a small-batch recipe that can be put together in 10 minutes, and sits on the couture for 3-5 days. | www.feastingathome.com

Happy alive food, that will boost your immunity and help heal your gut.

Let me know what you think!

Sylvia

PS. Lately, we have been using this Fermentation Kit that has crystal weights that fit perfectly in a wide-mouth mason jar.  It is so convenient for small batch ferments. This fermentation kit includes the jars which is a great option too!

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Turmeric Sauerkraut


Description

How to make Turmeric Sauerkraut- a small-batch recipe that can be put together in 10 minutes, and sits on the counter for 3-5 days!


Ingredients

Scale
  • 1/2 organic cabbage- (1 pound) finely sliced, or shredded ( save one outer cabbage leaf for the top)
  • 1/4 onion – finely sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves- minced
  • fine sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon fresh ginger- finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated turmeric- or sub 1/2 teaspoon ground
  • Optional additions- grated carrots, whole spices like caraway seeds, cumin seeds, coriander seeds, fresh herbs- use your imagination!

Instructions

  1. Slice cabbage and onion thinly ( you can also shred in a food processor or use a mandoline) and place in a bowl. Add the garlic, and ginger.  Weight the cabbage-mixture in grams- take care not to weigh the bowl.  Multiply the cabbage grams by .02. This is the amount of salt you will need in grams. See notes.
  2. Add the salt. Massage cabbage well, which will open up its pores and allow for better fermentation.
  3. Add the turmeric and mix with tongs ( turmeric will stain your hands). Let stand 30-60 minutes to allow the cabbage to release its liquid.
  4. Mix again will once more and place into clean jars, packing down hard, leaving 2 inches head room. If the liquid does not come up over the cabbage while pressing down, you can add a little brine. ( see notes).  Cover with a cabbage leaf, pressing down ( to prevent oxidation and mold) so the cabbage is under the brine.
  5. To keep kraut pressed down under the surface of the liquid while it ferments you could weigh it down with a small zip lock bag filled with plain water, or another smaller jar, or a fermentation weight. Tuck it in the jar and cover loosely with the lid.
  6. Cover loosely with a lid and place in a bowl or pan on the counter for 4-5 days, covering with a kitchen towel, burping every day or so. ( If your lid is loose, you won’t need to burp).
  7. Fermentation will occur faster in the warmer months and slower during the cold months. It likes to be around 60-72F. In summer, find a cooler spot like in the basement. Longer cooler ferments do offer up the best flavor.
  8. When you see a little activity, usually after about 4-5 days- gas and or bubbling when you give it a stir -feel free to taste, letting it ferment and sour longer if you prefer, or keeping it fresh and crunchy by placing it in the fridge to stop or slow the process down.
  9. Store in the fridge, for up to 6 months, with a loose lid, or with a tight lid ( creating more bubbly ferment) making sure to burp.

Notes

  1. Salt Ratio: The recommended salinity for Sauerkraut is 1.5% – to 2.5% salt to the weight of the cabbage. Here we use 2% salt to the weight of the cabbage. Example:  1ooo grams cabbage multiplied x .02= 2o grams of salt. Feel free to use more or less as long as it stays between 1.5%  and 2.5%. I use Himalayan Sea Salt and Real Salt.  Both are natural and unrefined with high mineral content.Cabbage: Use organic cabbage if possible. Do not use pre-shredded cabbage. You need the natural bacteria from a whole cabbage. Farmers’ market cabbage works especially well.

    In volume, the general salt to cabbage ratio is 2 ½ -3 tablespoons salt to 5 lbs cabbage.  Or for every one pound of cabbage 1.5-1.75 teaspoons salt.  (One large cabbage weighs about 2 pounds).

  2. Brine: If topping off with  a salt water brine, mix 1 ¼ teaspoons salt to 1 cup water.
  3. Using organic or farmers market cabbage often has the BEST results- that’s because the bacteria that ferments the cabbage actually comes from the surface of the cabbage to begin with. Garden grown or farmer’s market cabbage has more of this live bacteria still on it compared to grocery store varieties.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: ¼ cup
  • Calories: 37
  • Sugar: 0.5 g
  • Sodium: 295.7 mg
  • Fat: 0.1 g
  • Saturated Fat: 0 g
  • Carbohydrates: 8.3 g
  • Fiber: 0.7 g
  • Protein: 1.5 g
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg

Keywords: turmeric sauerkraut, how to make sauerkraut, easy sauerkraut, sauerkraut recipes, best sauerkraut recipe

 

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  1. With this recipe I produced a jar of tangy and brilliantly colored kraut! Made as written with no additions but a touch of brine, will try with carrot next time.

  2. Sylvia,
    Thank you for this amazing recipe! I made it and love it. Great spin on natural probiotic, like sauerkraut, with addition of superfoods like ginger and turmeric. “Golden kraut”, I call it)

  3. I bought the recommended jars but the cabbage did not release enough water so I added regular water to it. Will it still work?

    1. That should be fine-was it just a little water? If you added quite a bit like a whole cup’s worth, I’d add an extra teaspoon of salt.

  4. Hi Sylvia, I’m really excited to try this recipe, and I’m wondering whether you think it would be ok to omit the turmeric and add some gochujang chilli paste and a little soy sauce instead, to make it like more of a fine kimchi? Thank you, Chloe x

    1. Yes- there is also a kimchi recipe on the blog if you rather follow that one.

      1. Yes, I’ve followed it before with great results, but wanted to opt for a slightly less time-consuming method this time around! Thanks a lot x

  5. In the post photos itself, I’m using 2-quart mason jars (Half gallon jars) but I added some links to a fermentation kit which includes the jars.

    1. Got it! I added some links in the post above to a fermentation kit we’ve been using.:)

  6. Hi there, always i used to check blog posts here in the early hours in the daylight, as i love to
    gain knowledge of more and more.

  7. Hello! What do you mean by “medium-ground” sea salt? Does that mean course sea salt? If so, would “fine” sea salt achieve the same results? That is usually what I use.

  8. Absolutely delicious on a hot dog! I went for extra turmeric and slightly less garlic. The bright golden color is really fun too.

  9. Well I’ve been doing sauerkraut for about 6 years now with different types of ingredients but this is the the first time using turmeric, garlic and carrots.. It smells fabulous and I can’t wait to try it in a couple of weeks when the fermentation process ends. I did up 15 pounds of cabbage in a 2 gallon crock and adjusted the remaining ingredients to accommodate that ratio.. Thanks so much for sharing your recipe. I’ll check back in a few weeks and let you know how it turned out.. I’m sure it will be fantastic..

  10. Does the “liquid” you mention come out of the cabbage? There’s no water mentioned in the recipe.

  11. I tried this recipe and loved it. I added 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon lime juice and 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar. It was delicious. My husband is on a very low salt diet, that is why we use the lime juice and vinegar. I get lots of free local limes from my sister’s tree.

    1. from what know that vinegar will actually not allow things ferments and possibly killing the bacteria your trying to have . just my opinion

  12. Your pictures are absolutely stunning. Did you use a macro lens to get the blur / focus effect on the items in the photo? Very beautiful and makes me want to try sauerkraut even more! Have you ever attempted to make sauerkraut with red cabbage? I’m curious the color that would come out of adding the very yellow properties of turmeric to some red cabbage kraut. I am starting to eat an increasing amount of sauerkraut lately to improve my gut health! Thank you for your article, hopefully it inspires more people to make their own fermented foods!

    1. Thanks Billy. Yes I use a 50 mm macro lens. Red Kraut is beautiful too but have not tried it with the turmeric. Would love to see it if you attempt it! Tag it on instagram or send it via email: sylvia@feastingathome.com

  13. QUESTION: I can’t seem to see the Nutritional Information. Is it hidden, or blank? I’m wondering how much sodium, fiber, calories, etc.

        1. Strange. I don’t see it anywhere on the page. Isn’t it supposed to be immediately after the recipe at the bottom?

  14. I am going to have to try this recipe. I already make my own sauerkraut using a couple of whole cloves of garlic. My wife likes it a little spicy so she makes kimchi. And now you introduced me to a turmeric variation. Fermented vegetables are great for your health. I have also made a batch using just shredded carrots and some spices.

    1. Hi Terry, I am making fermented carrots too! Fermenting is so much fun, isn’t it? Hope you having a beautiful morning.

    1. Hi Jae, surprisingly no vinegar. As the kraut ferments on the counter, it develops it sourness. And the longer it ferments, the more sour it gets!

      1. No vinegar. Just salted water (brine) would start the fermentation process. It is a different type of fermentation/pickling. I use this on cabbage, green (unripe) tomatoes, small cucumbers, cauliflower….
        On the recipe I got, I used horseradish as preservative (for overwinter), but if it is a “summer pickle” no need. Then yes, you play with spices to your taste. I use dill a lot.
        If I am not mistaken my mom used to put baby watermelons or half ripe tomatoes. Those are not do die for, but to kill for :-))

        1. Questions regarding preserving:
          How long does it preserve and how much would a 32 oz. quart jar need of the horseradish as a preservative and how long does this preserve?
          I also read that mustard oil has a higher/preservative effect?
          Have you used this before?
          Thank you.

Hi, I'm Sylvia!

Chef and author of the whole-foods recipe blog, Feasting at Home, Sylvia Fountaine is a former restaurant owner and caterer turned full-time food blogger. She currently lives in the Pacific Northwest and shares seasonal, healthy recipes along with tips and tricks from her home kitchen.

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