Made with just 3 ingredients, this Sage Oxymel is an easy home remedy full of antimicrobial and antioxidant properties to heal and soothe sore throats, coughs, and colds.   Perfect to make when sage is in abundance and a lifesaver to have on hand. A simple, clean recipe made with common ingredients.

Made with just 3 ingredients, this Sage Oxymel is an easy home remedy full of antimicrobial and antioxidant properties to heal and soothe sore throats, coughs, and colds.   Perfect to make when sage is in abundance and a lifesaver to have on hand. A simple, clean recipe made with common ingredients.

What if the world is holding its breath waiting for you to take the place that only you can fill? ~ David Whyte

Sage Oxymel is a very simple home remedy that takes very little time to put together.  Fresh garden sage, raw honey and raw apple cider vinegar are combined with a little bit of time, resulting in a very potent medicine!

I find making home medicines for my family and friends incredibly satisfying.  I love the whole process from picking and gathering the plant material, to chopping and procuring. Having a few nourishing clean remedies on the shelf gives me peace of mind for treating some of our ailments that may arise in the future.

I talk to the plants as I work with thanking them for their incredible nutrients and for the amazing healing they provide.  Having a relationship with the plants around us connects us more deeply with the earth and ourselves.  Mother Earth celebrates our healing and wants to nourish us!

fresh sage

Sage, in days gone by, was known as salvia salvatrix or sage the savior, the latin root of sage translates to save or to heal.  Sage has been shown to increase cognitive function, enhance memory and mood as well as reduce hot flashes, digestive issues, and skin conditions. Among many of its touted qualities, it has long been used to soothe a sore throat.

My sage plant is going crazy right now.  I love using fresh sage for oxymel though you can also use dried sage leaves.  As you chop the fresh leaves, take in the scent of the plant and whisper some healing intentions as you create this tonic.  I promise you it will make your medicine so much more potent!

What is Oxymel?

An Oxymel by definition a mixture of raw honey and vinegar. The word oxymel comes from the Greek “oxymeli,” which literally translates as acid and honey.  Oxymels have been around for centuries, a classic medicinal elixir documented since the age of Hippocrates.

ingredients in oxymel: ac vinegar, raw honey, fresh sage

What you will need for Oxymel

  • Fresh Sage– Rich in compounds with high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.  Sage is an astringent herb, creating an action that tightens the mucosal tissues.  It tones swollen tissues, which brings relief.
  • Raw Honey–  Highly nutritious and has potent germ-fighting and antibacterial qualities.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar– Boosts immunity, soothes dry throats, and improves digestive issues. Vinegar extracts the medicinal constituents, like minerals, from plants and inhibits the growth of dangerous microbes.

Honey and vinegar are both known to support the immune system and are excellent preservers.  The oxymel will last a year or longer.

How to make Oxymel

STEP ONE- Chop up the sage fairly small so more of the plant can get extracted into the vinegar.

 

STEP TWO- Combine the sage and honey in a clean, sterilized pint jar.

Made with just 3 ingredients, this Sage Oxymel is an easy home remedy full of antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.  Perfect to make when sage is in abundance and a lifesaver to have on hand to heal and soothe sore throats, coughs, and colds.     A simple, clean recipe made with common ingredients.

STEP THREE- As you pour in the vinegar, stir with a chopstick to release air bubbles.  Make sure the sage is completely submerged with the liquid.  You want at least 1/4″ of space at the top of the jar.

STEP FOUR- Store the jar in a cool, dry place for at least 2 weeks, shake it daily, and make sure the sage stays submerged.  Strain the mixture through a fine mesh strainer and pour into a bottle with a cork or sealed lid.

Made with just 3 ingredients, Sage Oxymel is an easy home remedy to heal and soothe sore throats, coughs, and colds.

Ways to take Sage Oxymel

  • by the spoonful
  • add a splash to hot water for a soothing tea
  • add to sparkling water for a refreshing cooler

Enjoy creating this oxymel.  May it bring you healing and relief!

~Tonia

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Made with just 3 ingredients, this Sage Oxymel is an easy home remedy full of antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.  Perfect to make when sage is in abundance and a lifesaver to have on hand to heal and soothe sore throats, coughs, and colds.     A simple, clean recipe made with common ingredients.

Sage Oxymel (a respiratory tonic)

  • Author: Tonia | Feasting at Home
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 15 minutes
  • Yield: 1 1/2 cups 1x
  • Category: tonic
  • Method: stirred
  • Cuisine: American

Description

Made with just 3 ingredients this Sage Oxymel is an easy home remedy for throat and lung healing.  Full of antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.  Perfect to make when sage is in abundance and great to have on hand to heal and sooth sore throats, coughs and colds.

 


Ingredients

Units Scale
  • 2 cups fresh sage, chopped small, or 1 cup of dried
  • 1/21 cup raw honey (adjust to your desired level of sweetness)
  • 1 cup raw apple cider vinegar

Instructions

  1. Combine the sage and honey together in a clean sterilized pint jar.
  2. As you pour in the vinegar, stir with a chop stick to release air bubbles.  Make sure the sage is completely submerged with the liquid.  You want at least 1/4″ of space at the top of the jar.
  3. Clean the rim and seal with a lid.  If you are using metal lid (vinegar corrodes metal) place a piece of plastic wrap or parchment paper between the jar and the lid.
  4. Store the jar in a cool dry place for at least 2 weeks shake it daily, make sure the sage stays submerged.
  5. Strain the mixture through a fine mesh strainer and pour into a bottle with a cork or sealed lid.

Store up to a year.


Notes

Ways to take Oxymel

  • by the spoonful
  • add a splash to hot water for a soothing tea
  • add to sparkling water for a refreshing cooler

Note that sage is not recommended in large amounts in pregnancy and breastfeeding.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 tablespoon
  • Calories: 39
  • Sugar: 5.9 g
  • Sodium: 1.6 mg
  • Fat: 0.4 g
  • Saturated Fat: 0.2 g
  • Carbohydrates: 9.4 g
  • Fiber: 1.3 g
  • Protein: 0.7 g
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg

Keywords: oxymel, oxymel recipe, how to make oxymel, Sage Oxymel, respiratory tonic

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Comments

  1. I LOVE this oxymel – it’s so delicious and to know that it is literally doing me such good… I’m about to go into the garden to harvest more sage so that I have enough oxymel on standby for winter. Thank you!

  2. What kind of fresh sage should I use? There are many varieties online. I cannot find that amount (2 cups) locally in NJ. Any ideas where to purchase?

    1. Garden sage (salvia officinalis is the botanical name)- any variety is fine. Farmers markets and local farms- you could try asking at your local health food market.

  3. I’m going to make this tomorrow! Does it have to be refrigerated after it is finished or is it shelf stable? Thanks

  4. I’d really like to try this but have no idea where to get fresh sage. Maybe I’ll try growing it. By the way, Croatian friend of mine it a tennis couch and in his country athletes use honey and apple cider vinegar mixed in water as an energy drink. This leads me to believe your recipe would be great. Thanks

    1. Hi Sago, I love that! Sage is a lovely plant to grow but in the meantime, do you have any famers markets where you live? You can ask them for fresh sage.

  5. Love it! I grow many herbs and would enjoy more recipes using them.Some electuaries or tinctures? Thank you,Debbie

    1. Usually at the onset of a sore throat and to soothe a cold and cough. Though I do take it on occasion just as a tonic.

  6. I wonder if adding additional herbs would work with this. Oregano is an antibiotic & antiviral, turmeric is anti-inflammatory. Garlic is good for so much but may make the taste completely off putting.