Violet Simple Syrup! Perfect in cocktails or mocktails, or even in sparkling water. Perfect for special gatherings like Mothers Day, Bridal Showers or Weddings. Romantic, floral & feminine. The possibilities are endless! 

An easy recipe for Violet Simple Syrup- lovely in cocktails like a Violet infused French 75 - perfect for Mothers Day, Bridal Showers or Weddings. Romantic, floral, feminine. | www.feastingathome.com

Forgiveness is the fragrance that the violet sheds on the heel that has crushed it. ~ Mark Twain

My little friend Dylan helped me pick violets this morning. Their sweet, grape-scented blossoms are unbelievably fragrant and are sprouting up everywhere this spring. An easy way to capture their lovely essence is to make Violet Syrup from their petals.

The violet syrup can then be added to mocktails, cocktails, or desserts perfect for spring gatherings, Mother’s Day, bridal showers or weddings!

An easy recipe for Violet Simple Syrup- lovely in cocktails like a Violet infused French 75 - perfect for Mothers Day, Bridal Showers or Weddings. Romantic, floral, feminine. | www.feastingathome.com

Dylan’s mother, and my dear friend, Cheri, made this Violet Syrup the other day and I immediately fell in love with it and knew I had to share it with you. Not only for its beautiful color, taste and fragrance but for the simple fact that these violets are everywhere, growing wild in our lawns, and how mostly, they go unnoticed, crushed beneath our feet.

Here’s a way to celebrate them, bring them into our kitchens, and let them infuse our everyday lives with their extraordinary loveliness.

What you’ll need

  • Wild Violets, free of pesticides. There are different kinds of violets. These COMMON BLUE VIOLETS are from Eastern Washington and have a very small calyx (the green part that holds the petals) and sweet grape smell. If unsure, please try this page for identification.
  • Filtered Water or Distilled Water. Hard water may discolor the syrup.
  • White sugar. Using golden-colored sugar will discolor the syrup.

An easy recipe for Violet Simple Syrup- lovely in cocktails like a Violet infused French 75 - perfect for Mothers Day, Bridal Showers or Weddings. Romantic, floral, feminine. | www.feastingathome.com

 

How to make Violet Syrup

An easy recipe for Violet Simple Syrup- lovely in cocktails like a Violet infused French 75 - perfect for Mothers Day, Bridal Showers or Weddings. Romantic, floral, feminine. | www.feastingathome.com

How to Make Violet Syrup

  1. Collect the violets and remove any green stems, leaves and calyx.
  2. Soak violets in hot water, and let this sit overnight. Strain the violet-infused water through a fine-mesh sieve, gently pressing any additional liquid from the violets.
  3. Stir violet water over a bain-marie or in the same pot over very low heat, add sugar, until the sugar dissolves. Be careful not to boil as you will lose the gorgeous color of the violets.
  4. Store the syrup in a bottle or jar in the refrigerator for up to 6 months.

An easy recipe for Violet Simple Syrup- lovely in cocktails like a Violet infused French 75 - perfect for Mothers Day, Bridal Showers or Weddings. Romantic, floral, feminine. | www.feastingathome.com

Ways to use Violet Syrup

  • Cocktails
  • Mocktails
  • Add to desserts, frostings.
  • Cupcakes
  • Add to sparkling water

An easy recipe for Violet Simple Syrup- lovely in cocktails like a Violet infused French 75 - perfect for Mothers Day, Bridal Showers or Weddings. Romantic, floral, feminine. | www.feastingathome.com

An easy recipe for Violet Simple Syrup- lovely in cocktails like a Violet infused French 75 - perfect for Mothers Day, Bridal Showers or Weddings. Romantic, floral, feminine. | www.feastingathome.com

Enjoy the Violet Syrup!

xoxoxo

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Violet Syrup

  • Author: Sylvia Fountaine | Feasting at Home Blog
  • Prep Time: 24 hours
  • Cook Time: 15 mins
  • Total Time: 24 hours 15 mins
  • Yield: 2 cups 1x
  • Category: cocktails, drinks, sauce
  • Method: infused
  • Cuisine: American
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

Violet Simple Syrup! Perfect in cocktails ( like a Violet infused French 75) or mocktails. Think Mothers Day, Bridal Showers or Weddings. Romantic, floral & feminine. The possibilities are endless!


Ingredients

Units Scale
  • 1 cup violets, packed
  • 1 cup filtered water, or use distilled.
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 13 drops lemon juice- optional

Instructions

  1. Collect violets that are free from pesticides. Remove leaves, stems and calyx-  basically remove everything that isn’t a purple petal.
  2. Bring 1 cup of filtered water to a simmer in a small pot. Turn the heat off, let the water stand 5 minutes to cool slightly, then add the violets to the pot, stir, and let cool completely. Do NOT boil the violets. Cover with a kitchen towel and let stand for at least 24 hours on the kitchen counter.
  3. Strain the violet-infused water through a fine-mesh sieve, gently pressing any additional liquid from the violets. Return strained violette water to a bain-marie. Add sugar. (For every cup of liquid yielded, add 1 cup of sugar)
  4. Stir sugar into the violet water over a bain-marie or in the same pot over very very low heat, just until the sugar dissolves and is incorporated.  DO NOT SIMMER or BOIL as you will lose the gorgeous color of the violets. Just warm enough to dissolve the sugar.  You should have a beautiful cool blue-hued syrup.
  5. Optional: To turn the syrup to more of a clear purple color as you see here, stir in one drop of lemon juice, one drop at a time (1-3 drops) or if you prefer the cool blue hue, leave the lemon out! Too much lemon will make the color completely disappear- so be careful here.
  6. Store the syrup in a bottle or jar in the refrigerator for up to 6 months.

Notes

VIOLETS:

There are different kinds of violets. Please make sure you are using Common Blue Violets.(They should smell sweet and grape-y) If unsure, please try this page for identification. You are looking for WILD violets with the botanical name of Viola sororia or Viola sororia albiflora. The kind grown in shady parts of your lawn in zones 3-8.  They typically have a little bit of gold in the center. Make sure they are untreated with pesticides!

The calyx (the green part that holds the petals) can turn the lovely blue-purple color to brown, and give the syrup a “green” spinachy taste. The flowers alone will give the syrup a lovely grape-y floral taste. So take your time here and be patient, removing all the green!

 

To make a Violet Infused French 75 : In a shaker fill with ice, add one ounce gin, ½ ounce lemon juice and 1/2 ounce of violet syrup. Shake well and strain into a chilled flute or cocktail coupe. Top with chilled Champagne or Prosecco and garnish with lemon twist and a fresh-picked violet.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 tablespoon
  • Calories: 26
  • Sugar: 6.4 g
  • Sodium: 0.4 mg
  • Fat: 0 g
  • Saturated Fat: 0 g
  • Carbohydrates: 6.8 g
  • Fiber: 0 g
  • Protein: 0 g
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg

Keywords: violet syrup, violet recipes, recipes using violets, violet simple syrup, simple syrup recipes, best simple syrup recipe, simple syrup,

 

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Comments

  1. I have wild violets in my yard here in Colorado, most are purple and a few are white, all smell amazing and I’ve even eaten a few and they taste wonderful. I only had enough for a small batch. I followed your recipe but used half the sugar since I prefer to eat as few carbs as possible. It smells and tastes amazing and the color is perfect! I mixed some with lemonata pellegrino and gin and it turned a beautiful rosy purple color and is so delicious. Thanks for the great recipe.

  2. Just a note that Viola sororia has no scent — https://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/savanna/plants/cm_violet.htm
    The strong scented violets are from Europe: https://growingwithplants.com/2021/04/scented-violets/

    ” if you have violets that smell pretty in your garden (in North America or in Europe and the UK) it’s probably the Sweet Violet or Viola odorata. This species looks nearly identical to Viola scoria and other violet species, but it has a strong scent.”

  3. I’m sorry to hear that-a little heartbreaking I imagine. My guess is it must have been the type of violet.

  4. I made this syrup today, not too hot of water, and the color is a gorgeous blue! It does smell a bit of “green” and spinachy, but the taste is sweet.

    I bottled it blue with a recipe card – one side for lemonade (so the recipient can see the magic color changes) and one side with the Frech 75 recipe.

    1. I think it should be fine for a few weeks, or until you see any signs of mold.

  5. A very nice little syrup!

    Our local violets have large calyxes, so I just used the petals. It’s very mild and has a faint blueberry taste.

    Thank you for taking the time to write the recipe!

  6. My syrup is a beautiful purple but it smells super weird. While it was steeping it smelled like downright nasty. Tastes just like sugar though, really. Did I do something wrong? It’s more vegetable than floral.

    1. On no Izzy! I wonder if it may be the type of violet you used? There are so many kinds out there- mine had a clear scent of sweet “grape” flavor.

  7. Lost all color after stirring in the sugar. Not sure what I did wrong but this is my first time making violet syrup. It’s still nice and sweet just not purple.

    1. I had a similar issue, mine was a blue turqoise color and I put in too much lemon, more than 5 drops, whoops, it quickly went from blue to purple to almost clear, had better luck on my second batch, less lemon juice is better.

  8. Botany note: sweet violet (V. odorata) is from Europe, but it does grow in eastern Washington, and I can’t help but think that’s what you have. It looks very much like common blue violet, V. sororia, which is what we have around here. Like other native violets in my area, V. sororia doesn’t have much odor or flavor, although it still makes the beautiful color. I used distilled water, and 1:1 liquid/sugar as in typical simple syrup. It will dissolve without heat. Keep stirring!

  9. This is my second year making this recipe and I love it so much! Last year I made it with violets in my yard and neighbor’s yard. It was a pinkish-purple, with a lovely delicate flavor. This year I found a patch of violets at my grandparents’ property and used those. It was much more blue and the violet fragrance and flavor much more apparent. I believe both are viola odorata, but the difference was neat! Thank you for sharing.

  10. Only VIOLA ODORATA possesses the lovely, elusive violet scent. The common VIOLA TRICOLOR, which can grow in most yards, has NO scent at all. It does, however, make lovely candied flowers for pastry decorating and is a beautiful edible flower.
    The sweet scented ODORATA is extremely picky concerning the climate in which it will grow and flourish. So much so that there are very few micro-climates that can accommodate it. Several years ago there was an actual shortage of this much sought after wild flower, for perfumers and the food industry. All of the problems listed here stem from using violets from the unscented strain. All but the Odorata fall into that category. Thus, it is highly prized.

  11. I have been reading up on making violet syrup and one of the other websites stated that if your water was hard it could turn the mixture green. She recommended using distilled water. I am going to try that because my water is very hard!

  12. Love the recipe but please be sure to correctly identify your flowers before making this as some violets are toxic. 😉 https://www.homestratosphere.com/types-of-violets/

  13. I tried this recipe and followed it as accurately as possible. I did let the petals steep for a about 25 hours instead of 24, but the smell is quite unpleasant. It’s like funky dirty socks and a mud puddle. I’m honestly scared to taste it even though I used all of the sugar, thinking it would improve the odor.
    What could have gone wrong?

    1. I think it not the same type of violet I used. I had no idea how many varieties there are, just learning this. Sorry.

  14. I live in St Louis, MO and have a backyard full of wild violets. I picked lots, took off the stems and calalyx and used the petals. I boiled the 1C water, then let it cool for about 10 min then put in a bit over 4 cups of petals and stirred. The petals (which were fresh), absorbed the water and swelled filling the pot. i let them sit (covered) for a little over 24 hrs, then strained (and did my best to push the water out – 2 sieves sandwiched together, pressing with spoon, etc. ended up with 2/3 cup of liquid. No real flavor to it and while their was a slight blue caste to the water, it wasn’t much. Added a little over 1 C fine bakers sugar, and dissolved it in the water. Added a bit of lemon which did change it to a violet caste, but not it has to be in a clear glass to see it. No real taste except for the sugar. Thinking I may have wrong type of violets or my water wasn’t hot enough.

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